Timothy W Secomb, PhD

Professor, Physiology
Research Professor, Arizona Research Laboratories
Professor, Mathematics
Email Address: 
Phone Number: 
(520) 626-4513
FAX: 
(520) 626-3376

UACC Information

UACC Organizational Unit: 
Professional Bio: 

Dr. Secomb is a Professor of Physiology. He has been conducting research focusing on the microcirculation for 35 years. The microcirculation is a network of extremely small blood vessels that supplies oxygen and nutrients to all parts of our tissues. The focus of his research is the use of mathematical and computational approaches to study blood flow and mass transport in the microcirculation, structural adaptation of vessels and angiogenesis and local regulation of blood flow. Other areas of research include development of models for the pharmacodynamics of cancer drugs, and the mechanics of the left ventricle.

Working in collaboration with experimentalists, Dr. Secomb aims to understand quantitatively the processes involved. Based on this work, he has published more than 160 peer reviewed journal articles, obtaining more than 7200 citations and an h-index of 44 (Web of Science). He also has substantial experience as a mentor, including his current role as the Program Director of an NIH T32 training grant “Computational and mathematical modeling of biomedical systems,” and mentoring 10 predoctoral and 10 postdoctoral trainees.

Based on his experience in theoretical modeling in physiology, with emphasis on microcirculation, and hist established ongoing research program devoted to understanding blood flow, oxygen transport, drug transport, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis in normal and tumor tissues, Dr. Secomb believes that he is well qualified for his role in the research program for which support is being requested.

Further information on Dr. Secomb

Research Information

Research Program: 
Cancer Imaging
Member Status: 
Research Member
Summary of Research Activity: 

The microcirculation is a network of extremely small blood vessels that supplies oxygen and nutrients to all parts of our tissues. The focus of work in our research group is the use of mathematical and computational approaches to study blood flow and mass transport in the microcirculation. Working in collaboration with experimentalists, we aim to understand quantitatively the processes involved. The main areas of our work are:

Mechanics of blood flow in microvessels. We are examining the relationship between red blood cell mechanics and flow resistance in microvessels. Theoretical predictions agree well with observations in glass tubes, but resistance is higher living tissue. We have found that the major cause is the presence of a relatively thick macromolecular lining (endothelial surface layer) on the walls of microvessels.

Mass transport to tissue. We are simulating oxygen exchange between networks of microvessels and surrounding tissues in skeletal muscle and tumors. In skeletal muscle, we have shown how oxygen can be exchanged diffusively between arterioles and capillaries, and we are studying the determinants of maximal oxygen consumption. In tumors, we are studying the relationship between network structure and occurrence of local hypoxic (radiation-resistant) regions. Also, we are analyzing the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor tissues.

Structural adaptation of microvascular networks. We are developing models for the stuctural responses of microvessels to functional demands. We have found that maintenance of a stable, functionally adequate distribution of vessel diameters can be achieved if each vessel responds to changes in wall shear stress, intravascular pressure and local metabolic conditions, and if mechanisms exist for information transfer upstream and downstream along flow pathways.

Regulation of blood flow: We are developing models for the active regulation of blood flow by changes in vascular tone, taking into account vascular responses to wall shear stress, pressure and local metabolic state, and including effects of conducted responses along vessel walls.

Selected Publications: 

Academic Information

Doctorate: 
Applied Mathematics, University of Cambridge
Master's Degree: 
MS, Mathematics, University of Melbourne
Undergraduate School: 
BS, (Honours) in Mathematics, University of Melbourne